hedrick-cs:

Inktober #14 : Fire Ferret ^^ !

nuktuk:

kaachiiin:

So I caught up on Korra.

THIS SO HAPPENED, I JUST KNOW IT.

g
Keeping Korra out of “After All These Years” makes “Korra Alone” a concentrated dose of pathos. The road to recovery is long and winding and we feel it when the show show fixes its attention on the arduous journey. There’s minimal crossovers from her snail mail correspondence with Mako, Bolin, and Asami; each voiceover pushes Team Avatar further and further apart. Korra can’t even bring herself to write back to the boys, confiding diffidence and guilt to her only female friend. Though Korra’s encounter with Zaheer didn’t directly deal with her femininity, this moment frames the attack in new light. No matter what the circumstances, if a man infringes on a woman, there are shades of the experience that other men just won’t understand. It’s a beautiful, subtle message for the writers to flirt with.

missshadsie:

This was the most kickass scene in animated history

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology.

Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well:  Capitalism and Monarchy, respectively.

I didn’t want to seize power for myself which is what you’ve done.

weaselpoof:

At least the prince is still sane

avatarparallels:

I’m an old lady!

korra-avatastic:

The Legend of Korra Video Game behind the scenes (x)

Release dates:

PS3, PS4, & Steam: Oct 21
Xbox 360 & Xbox One: Oct 22

korralogy:

But…what if everyone had their own frog squirrel?